Adults-Only Plays: Gritty Side of Small-Town Marriages

Mellisa Stein and Christie Iverson in "Laundry & Bourbon."

Mellisa Stein and Christie Iverson in “Laundry & Bourbon.”

By MARY ANN ROEHM
Arts Enter Cape Charles

November 17, 2014

The Arts Enter Cape Charles Players will present two one-act comedies at the Historic Palace Theatre opening Thursday, November 20 at 7:30 p.m. The plays will continue through the weekend with shows Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m. and a Sunday matinee at 3 p.m.

The one-act comedies “Lonestar” and “Laundry & Bourbon” were written by James McLure. In “Laundry and Bourbon,” directed by Clelia Sheppard, the action centers on the discontent and very funny gossip of three small-town wives whose marriages have turned out to be less than was hoped for.

The setting is the front porch of Roy (JP Paré) and Elizabeth’s (Christie Iverson) home in Maynard, Texas, on a hot summer afternoon. Elizabeth and her friend Hattie (Mellisa Stein) are whiling away the time folding laundry, watching TV, sipping bourbon and Coke, and gossiping about the many open secrets which are so much a part of small-town life. They are joined by the self-righteous Amy Lee (Sherri DeMarino) who, among other tidbits, can’t resist blurting out that Roy has been seen around town with another woman. While the ensuing conversation is increasingly edged with bitter humor, from it emerges a sense of Elizabeth’s inner strength and her quiet understanding of the turmoil which has beset her husband since his return from Vietnam. He is wild, and he is unfaithful, but he needs her, and she loves him. And she’ll be waiting for him when he comes home — no matter what others may say or think. [Read more...]

LETTER
Arts Festival Is Essence of Economic Development

August 18, 2014

DEAR EDITOR,

It is with much praise and gratitude that I express my sincere appreciation for the event “Harbor for the Arts” in Cape Charles August 1-17. As the second annual event, this arts festival deserves great acclaim. Not only has our cultural arts organization Arts Enter Cape Charles demonstrated expertise in grant and sponsorship funding, it has also proved to the world that our community has one of the premier cultural arts centers in the nation if not the world.

Performances and exhibitions took place over a two week period using venues that represented the best private and public assets of the Town of Cape Charles and her surrounding environs. Street performances, bands under pavilions on the park and at the beach, concerts and films in our beautifully restored historic theater, entertainers gathering audiences on the sidewalks, a multi-media dance production in a classic 150-year-old equestrian barn overlooking the seaside sounds and islands, and more — wherever one turned during these two weeks the cultural arts permeated our living space here in Cape Charles. How blessed this writer felt to be living and working in such an incredibly talented community!

Arts Enter Cape Charles deserves all of the support our community can possibly give — through attendance, financial gifts, sponsorships and volunteer participation. This dedicated group colors our community with excellence in the arts, offering instruction in the performing and visual arts as well as amazing performances that educate, entertain and thrill her audiences. This is the essence of economic development: establishing our community as a center of the arts and education, improving our reputation and attracting new growth and business to our region.

Thank you to Arts Enter Cape Charles for enriching our lives and lifting our souls!

DAVID L. KABLER
Machipongo

Letters to the Editor are welcome, and a diversity of opinions is encouraged. Send submissions to [email protected].

4 Comments

WAYNE CREED
Response to ‘Arts Festival Is Essence of Development’

By WAYNE CREED

August 19, 2014

In response to David Kabler’s letter (CLICK), I certainly agree with everything Capt K is saying, especially “establishing our community as a center of the arts and education, improving our reputation and attracting new growth and business to our region.”

However, the deconstructionist in me would be remiss not to point out that textually the narrative always bleeds over and tends to occupy the most important part of the narrative, out in the margins, echoing Guy Debord’s claims that different commodities conflict with each other, preventing the consumer from consuming the whole. Each commodity claims itself as the only existent one:
“Irreconcilable claims jockey for position on the stage of the affluent economy’s unified spectacle, and different star commodities simultaneously promote conflicting social policies.”

What I mean is that as beautiful a celebration of the Arts as Harbor for the Arts was, simultaneously, right across town, in the old school, crews were working to demolish the oldest, most historical stage on the Eastern Shore.

As much as I love and support everyone and everything involved in HFA, it’s still hard to reconcile these “oppositional” events. I guess my ultimate criticism is that the ultimate goal here, as described by Kabler, is economic development; however, this belief is couched in the belief that existence is structured in terms of oppositions (historical significance and social justice or grants for digital cameras) and that these oppositions are hierarchical, with one side of the opposition being more valuable than the other (this is certainly the reality (of the street) that the historically underserved are being expected to accept). The courts certainly seem to agree with this, and insist that we urgently re-inscribe this new hierarchy (devalue social and historical significance and replace it with the “New”: see Hotel Cape Charles) so that we can move ahead with “economic development” as the main driver. [Read more...]

9 Comments

WEEKEND: Last Days of Harbor Arts Festival

SATURDAY AUGUST 16 

8:30 a.m. – Yoga in the Park: Start your weekend mornings with a body/mind practice.

jeff11-1 p.m. —  Jeff Madsen outside Brown Dog Ice Cream: Jeff Madsen entertains with rich vocals and classic acoustics.

1 p.m. — Narrowpath on Strawberry Street: Narrowpath is a contemporary Christian band from the Eastern Shore. They write their own music, and their songs speak to the struggles and the joys of the Christian walk.

5:30 p.m. — Andrew McKnight & Beyond Borders on Strawberry Street: Singer/songwriter Andrew McKnight’s music traverses influences from Appalachia, tasteful slide and jazzy blues, feisty anthems, rustic folk, and guitar-driven rock while blending his charming tenor voice and acoustic and electric guitars with banjo, upright bass, drums, and percussion.

7:30 p.m. — Experimental Film Screenings 2014 in the Palace Theatre: Premiere of the 3-minute short films created during the workshop in Cape Charles with comments by the various filmmakers. A culmination of the intense work generated by the international workshop participants. Films highlight Cape Charles location and characters. Special guests include Grammy Award winner Noemie LaFrance, Andy Edmunds from the Virginia Film Institute and Italian film maker Lorenzo Minoli.

tropi8:30 p.m.-midnight — Tropikiimba, Cuban salsa dance party, Cape Charles Yacht Center: Huge party with dancing, food, cash bar, special events, and entertainment co-sponsored by the Cape Charles Yacht Center. (See poster on page 1.)

SUNDAY AUGUST 17

8:30 a.m. – Yoga in the Park

4 p.m. — Antonio Vitiello, Palace Theatre: Pianist, Antonio Vitiello from Naples, Italy, offers an eclectic variety of musical favorites, interspersed with well known songs by vocalist Gualtiero Cavalieri.

7 p.m. — Soulful Tones Band, Central Park: One of the hottest bands on the Eastern Shore, the Soulful Tones play Funk, R&B, Rock, Reggae and GO-GO. Bring a picnic and a chair. Margaritas available.

1 Comment

SHORT REVIEW: Parr Barn Party Was Big Surprise

August 15, 2014

Last Saturday was another big surprise presentation by Cape Charles Harbor Festival. Venue: Parr Barn — An old white barn at the end of a cornfield, overlooking the marshes and barrier islands of the Atlantic seaside. At the back of the barn, guests were in the periphery of a circular driveway and in the center a maleTaiwanese dancer clad in a billowing black skirt was miming in silence. Boooring.

After 10 minutes I was about to leave when suddenly appearing from the seaside was a female Taiwanese dancer in similar attire but in red, jumping ,writhing, pirouetting gracefully towards the black dancer in unison with a hypnotizing Chinese melody. Hmm — interesting. The two dancers went inside the barn and out came several dancers clad in all white costumes and gestured the audience to go with them inside the barn, up the stairs into the rafters.

Up there, we were enveloped in white smoke as the dancers danced and the audience stared, mesmerized. It felt like I was participating in someone else’s dream. After the sequence, someone started playing the violin by the big barn window with the big moon just hanging outside like a cliched landscape. We went back downstairs to another stage where a very talented husband and wife team (Bridgman and Packard) performed their magical, whimsical dancing as images were projected into a black screen. At times, it was hard to determine whether it was the real person dancing or an image. Totally engrossing.

Many thanks to the organizers and supporters of the Harbor Festival for bringing this avant garde productions to our little town.

– MARIA FRANCIA VARGAS DALKINSKY

 

Big Bash Saturday at New Yacht Center — All Invited

bayamo

The Baldwins are throwing open the new Cape Charles Yacht Center to the public Saturday, August 16, for a Cuban salsa dance party as part of the two-week-long Harbor for the Arts Festival. They promise “a huge Party with dancing, food, cash bar, special events, and entertainment.”

The party starts at 8:30 p.m. and goes until midnight. Music is by Orquesta Tropikiimba — Afro-Latino music “guaranteed to get people on their feet and dancing.” That includes Salsa, Timba, Songo, Bolero, Danzon, Cha Cha Cha, Charanga, Rumba, Bachata, Merengue, and Vallenato. Orquesta Tropikiimba is billed as “one of few authentic Afro-Caribbean Orchestras in the Virginia, Maryland, and Washington D.C. area.”

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Harbor for the Arts Features ‘Songs of the Sea’

songs of seaWEDNESDAY AUGUST 13

11 a.m.–1:00 p.m. – Art Instruction in the Art Room (10 Strawberry St.): Techniques in Charcoal:  Emerging:  Earth, Sky and Water. Exhibiting artist Lana Stephens will work with students on atmospheric charcoal techniques.  Lana will teach reductive methods and techniques to illustrate the various effects of charcoal on Mylar. Lana enjoys the smooth slick surface of Mylar and has perfected how to get powdery charcoal to stick to the surface. $45 — call 757 331-2787 to register.

8 p.m. — Songs of the Sea at the Palace Theatre: A music and art collaboration by Lana Stephens and Simon Petersson. Petersson’s song cycle, inspired by the poem “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allen Poe, consists of 10 songs that work together and tell a story of lost love and inescapable tragedy.  Stephens’ charcoal drawing are expressive and dream-like, oscillating between reality and fantasy.  The work is strongly influenced by the landscape of Southern Sweden as the majority of the visual and music was created in Sweden. Composer Lee Jordan Anders will accompany the performance. [Read more...]

Harbor for Arts Continues with Comedy, Classes, Jazz

pushersTUESDAY AUGUST 12

3 p.m. – Local Thespians at the Coffee House: Poet and author Robert Arthur together with the Edge Theatre cast will perform skits, readings and poetry.

4 p.m., 8 p.m. —  Let’s Get Funny! at the Palace Theatre: Workshops 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. with a comedy show at 8 p.m. Comedy show will include 20 minutes for ages 10-17 followed by 20 minutes for the adult group and then 20 minutes by The Pushers Team. Workshop is $35 — Call (757) 331-2787.

songs of seaWEDNESDAY AUGUST 13

11 a.m.–1:00 p.m. – Art Instruction in the Art Room (10 Strawberry St.): Techniques in Charcoal:  Emerging:  Earth, Sky and Water. Exhibiting artist Lana Stephens will work with students on atmospheric charcoal techniques.  Lana will teach reductive methods and techniques to illustrate the various effects of charcoal on Mylar. Lana enjoys the smooth slick surface of Mylar and has perfected how to get powdery charcoal to stick to the surface. $45 — call 757 331-2787 to register.

8 p.m. — Songs of the Sea at the Palace Theatre: A music and art collaboration by Lana Stephens and Simon Petersson. Petersson’s song cycle, inspired by the poem “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allen Poe, consists of 10 songs that work together and tell a story of lost love and inescapable tragedy.  Stephens’ charcoal drawing are expressive and dream-like, oscillating between reality and fantasy.  The work is strongly influenced by the landscape of Southern Sweden as the majority of the visual and music was created in Sweden. Composer Lee Jordan Anders will accompany the performance.

THURSDAY AUGUST 14

11 a.m. — Shimmer Swimmers at the Cape Charles Library: Shadow puppets that will surprise and delight all audiences. Songs to sing,  sign language to learn, and more stories, including one about a beautiful, stranded mermaid.

7 p.m. — L’Tanya Mari Jazz Duo at Aqua at Kings Creek Marina: L’Tanya Mari’ is a nationally recognized and critically acclaimed jazz vocalist and creative arranger. Her 2009 recording “A Teardrop of Sun” landed her in a top spot on the American Jazz Charts. Her soaring voice, along with impeccable intonation, clear articulation and a confident, swinging delivery, has solidified Mari’ as a commanding force in the jazz vocal genre.

CLICK for additional information about performances during the Harbor for the Arts Festival.

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